Performance data

Performance data

TR-05
Compilation of solar cooker heating experiments, Summer 2015, Rockville, MD
This report includes plots summarize the “raw” data obtained from solar cooker heating experiments in 2015. Each of these experiments was intended to answer a particular question. All experiments were controlled by the use of two temperature measurements, so that the comparison would help to identify causes of variations.

TR-06
Findings from solar cooker heating data comparisons, 2015
The following tables summarize findings based on comparisons of heating curves (temperature vs. time) for pairs of solar cookers that were measured at the same time (that is, under the same solar radiation condition). This report is intended to accompany the earlier report TR-05, “Compilation of Solar Cooker Heating Experiments, 2015” and to provide discussions and findings from these experiments.

TR-08
Satellite imagery of atmosphere during experiments, 2015
Solar cooker heating experiments are affected by the transparency of the atmosphere across the entire spectrum from infrared to ultraviolet, though with peak energy in the visible part of the spectrum. One of the main variations in the infrared spectrum is due to the presence of water vapor, which causes strong absorption bands near 950, 1130, 1400 and 1800 nm and other bands at longer wavelengths.

TR-11
Compilation of solar cooker heating experiments, Summer 2016, Rockville, MD
This report includes plots summarize the “raw” data obtained from solar cooker heating experiments in 2016. Each of these experiments was intended to answer a particular question. All experiments were controlled by the use of two temperature measurements, so that the comparison would help to identify causes of variations.

TR-12
Findings from solar cooker heating data comparisons, 2016
The following tables summarize findings based on comparisons of heating curves (temperature vs. time) for pairs of solar cookers that were measured at the same time (that is, under the same solar radiation condition). This report is intended to accompany the earlier report TR-11, “Compilation of Solar Cooker Heating Experiments, 2016” and to provide discussions and findings from these experiments.

TR-28
Infrared imagery of the HotPot and Haines Dutch Oven
An infrared camera was used to identify areas around the HotPot and Haines cooking vessels where heat loss is evident. This report also illustrates the benefits of using infrared imagery for solar cooker development and improvement.

TR-30
Infrared imaging to identify sources of heat loss in the Haines solar cooker
This report describes additional infrared imaging data that was gathered relating to the Haines cooker’s reflector and conical polycarbonate cover.

TR-33
Thermal performance of some Mexican cooking pots
This report documents side-by-side comparison tests of several types of cooking pots that are available at low cost in Mexico. The tests were able to identify pots with better performance. In general, the performance is dependent on the quality of the seal on the lid of the pots, which is a major source of heat loss.

TR-35
Compilation of Solar Cooker Heating Experiments, Summer 2017
This report includes plots summarize the “raw” data obtained from solar cooker heating experiments in 2017. Each of these experiments was intended to answer a particular question. All experiments were controlled by the use of two to four temperature measurements, so that the comparison would help to identify causes of variations.